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OBC Int'l Interview, 2050

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In 2050, five interviews were held with wielvakian veterans on their recollections of their war by Osean reporter William Genette. Five more interviews were held with Erusean veterans as well. Due to poor translation services, only the Wielvakian interview has been published.

INTERVIEW 1 LT. GEN. DAVID S. PARKINSON (RET.) WIELVAKIAN ARMY

Genette: Good Afternoon, sir. My name is William Genette, OBC.

Parkinson: Hello, sir.

Genette: General, I'll ask a series of questions, and I'll audiotape the answers. Please answer honestly, remember, you are not being rushed or pressured. If you'd rather not talk about it, that's fine; we'll just move on.

Parkinson: Ok. Go ahead.

Genette: First of all, did you have a nickname?

Parkinson: Not in Erusea. When I was in Belka, though, they called me Mr. LaBone, since I was so scrawny in training. In the Army, nicknames catch on very quickly.

Genette: What did you do in Belka?

Parkinson: I was a field artillery technician. I would be either a shooter or a reloader.

Genette: What about Erusea? I know you were the leader of the Erusea campaign, but are there any specifics?

Parkinson: Um...just sort of a desk job, signing orders and all that. I remember during the battle of Le Liberte, it was so heavy they called me in. I got there, firing was so heavy you couldn't stand up. At first we just hit the dirt and stayed prone- lying down, but later we dug foxholes five foot radius and six foot deep. A friendly sniper managed to hit an enemy machinegunner, and the heavy fire stopped. We didn't get out of the foxholes, for fear of snipers. I sat there, then the hill just...exploded, and two A-10s flew past.

Genette: Would you say that you are a soldier, no matter the rank?

Parkinson: Oh, absolutely. I have a duty to serve my country, and I will do so in any manner required.

Genette: Thank you for your time, general.

Parkinson: Good day.

INTERVIEW 2 CMDR: JOSEPH A. PHILIPS (RET.)

Genette: Good afternoon, sir, my name is William Genette, OBC.

Philips: Hello, sir.

Genette: Commander, I'll ask some questions and audiotape the answers. Answer honestly, and if you don't feel like talking about something, we can just skip it.

Philips: I'm an open book, ask anything you like.

Genette: Ok, first, did you have a nickname?

Philips: I was a demolitions officer, my name was Joseph, so they called me 'Bazooka Joe'. Name stuck with me through to 2013, and I was honorably discharged in 2011!

Genette: Do you have any memories about any procedures or processes you went through?

Philips: There were quite a few. Do you want training or actual battlefield ops?

Genette: Which ever you feel like talking about.

Philips: During training in 2009 -of course, I never wished we had to use these strategies- we would get up at 4AM, 5 in the winter, and take care of regular morning stuff- breakfast, brush teeth, so on for 15 minutes. After that, we would run two miles. We'd work out for two hours, then take a break for a half hour. Then we'd get weapons training, and that was for every weapon, not just the one we had to use. That would be for the first two months. After that, we'd get specialized training; for me it would be an AT4 launcher. Commander Serra gave us combat ops.

Genette: Hold on sir. I have to exchange the tapes...ok, continue.

Philips: Early in 2010-I think it was March, sometime- we were instructed to go into the woods on a training exercise to set up a tree line for other Army units. Our orders were to find four intel officers that were ambushed. Of course, this was just a training exercise, so it was guys who looked for the officers while other guys posed as the ambushers. We used paintball guns. Serra gave me a gun that I didn't have too much experience with. We ran two miles out to the site, then hit the dirt. Fired into the trees for fifteen seconds. We got up, and he told us where we had to go. I was nestled near a tree. Then they came, our allies. I had to fire some shots at the 'enemies', but it worked out. ...Oh right, I was later hit in the lower right rib.

Genette: Ok. Now this was kind of a consensus among the Eruseans I interviewed and Parkinson, but what would you say was the heaviest battle you were in?

Philips: In any case, it's Le Liberte. I lost my buddy there. Thing was so hard, they had to pull General Parkinson there so he could fight. I'm sure he mentioned that.

Genette: I see. General Parkinson had mentioned.

Philips: There was an engagement I remember, I think it was in December? We were taking a recon team out to do spying on Fort Akers hill. We walked by a river, which had a small path on the bank for walking, and a larger path 3 feet above that for cars and whatnot. So we were walking, and our sniper tells us to hit the dirt, cars were coming. I laid down and I heard small cars going by bery slowly. Commander Serra told us to wait until they had passed us by ten feet, then shoot. It seemed like forever, then an infantryman by the name of Wipeout opened fire. I shot with my pistol, first, but then they left the convoy. We called in an air strike on them.

Genette: What planes were they using?

Philips: F-14A's.

Genette: Ok, thank you sir.

Philips: Oh, no problem. Have a good day.

INTERVIEW 3 COLE T. GALLUP, MIDSHIPMAN (RET.) WIELVAKIAN NAVY

Genette: Hello, sir. My name is William Genette, OBC. I'll ask questions and then tape your answers. Please be honest, and if something that you don't want to talk about comes up, we can just skip it.

Gallup: Um, ok.

Genette: So as I understand it, the Wielvaian navy has only been active twice in recent times?

Gallup: That's right, in Belka and in Erusea.

Genette: You were there both times?

Gallup: Yes, I was a mortar gunner for a riverboat in Belka, and a Early Warning Control officer in Erusea.

Genette: I didn't think the Navy would be so involved in Erusea, as there were minimal rivers for the riverboats.

Gallup: Well, the landing operation used twenty of our ships, including the WND Earthcrusher. I was on there to scope out any target that might be gunnin' for us or the landing ships and hovercraft and so on. There were seven people with that job, me involved. We landed the troops safely. I recall once in a while having to fire at some battery somewhere, and for a while, there was a rumor that the enemy would use cruise missiles, like they did in 2005 against ISAF.

Genette: I think I know what you're talking about, I heard about the ISAF landing then.

Gallup: Yeah. Especially when some recon flights showed SAMS thrirty miles inland. The intel wasn't that fresh, to befair. Now on to the landing...there were several batteries that almost sank one of the landing ships. There weren't enough troops or positions on the beach to defend the LZ-I think it was Quebec-, so we only lost 23 in the landing, out of 380.

Genette: Would you mind talking a bit about Belka?

Gallup: Wielvakian Navy was only over there for about three months, so we couldn't fight too much. There were only about eighteen divisions over there, then five riverboats and seven air squadrons. I was on a riverboat by the name of Sweet Sunshine. This one had napalm on it. I was the heavy gunner on the top turret, with another guy firing a machine gun next to me. We had the armor protecting us, as we were easy targets for snipers. The Sweet Sunshine was only over there for a month, we lost about two guys.

Genette: Were there any large scale skirmishes?

Gallup: Once we had to help an Osean batallion that got ambushed. That's pretty much it, but that's where the RTO and the Stern turret gunner were killed. 

Genette: Right. Thank you, sir.

Gallup: Anytime. Take 'er easy.

INTERVIEW 4 CHARLES F. DANCER, AIRMAN FIRST CLASS (RET.) WIELVAKIAN AIR FORCE

Genette: Hello, Mr. Dancer, my name is William Genette, OBC. I'll interview you and audiotape our conversation. There's no pressure, and if you don't feel like discussing something, we don't have to.

Dancer: Ok.

Genette: So as I understand it, you flew in both wars?

Dancer: Well, not really. I joined the Air Force un 1994, and recieved my training in Tucson. They sent me and my wingmen over to Belka. We flew A-10's-you know, those mean ol' shark-faced tank busters? I went over there, but never flew any missions. So no, I did not fly in Belka.

Genette: Ok, now about Erusea.

Dancer: Umm...oh, ok. Well, that's a different story entirely. I flew as a pilot and as the squadron lead. We were the only Su-32 operating squadron in all of Wielvakia. It was me, my navigator, and the second plane. The 534th fighter-bomber squadron, we were.

Genette: Wait, the Wielvakian Air Force only had two Su-32's?

Dancer: Yeah. It's a shame, too, that plane was MEAN. I mean, the Army, one day, decided to leave Fort Akers Hill, and got ambushed. Was quite a heavy battle, too. They launched us from Le Chariot, they launched F-14's and F-117 stealth bombers, and they kept us there for two hours. We had bombs under our intakes and one per wing, 2 air to ground missiles under the wings, and 2 air-air missiles on each wingtip. We came home clean, no weapons. Fuel was on vapors. But we got 'em. HARD, I'm telling you.

Genette: Even the air to air?

Dancer: They had MIR-2000's, fully loaded. One of them almost shot down an F-117 and they called us in.

Genette: Whew. Excuse me. So you flew for two hours like that without any kind of a break?

Dancer: Oh yeah. Wish we could pull into a gas station and buy some chips. "What's up?" Nothing, fightin' a war, fightin' a war.

Genette: Haha. Would you say that was the most excruciating part of the war?

Dancer: Oh no. Heck no. September first, two thousand and ten. Inavsion, right? They outfitted us with all air to air missiles. Of course we were shooting down planes the whole time. That wasn't the kicker. though. The thing was- I remember this sharply. There we were on the tarmac. Enemy fighters crowded the sky. We scrambled off and my buddy Col armed the missiles. Contact twenty miles away from Kingsman bay, they said.

Genette: Who's this they that you refer to?

Dancer: Davis-Monthan and our skywatch system. Anyway, they told us to intercept at close range, to attempt contact with them before agressing it. I other words, shooting down was the last option. We didn't know what they were talking about. We took off, dodged all the planes in the airspace (so many of them) and went out to Kingsman bay. Then we got a visual. It looked like a 757, except that it was gray save for an FEAF roundel. Had too low of an altitude, and looked like it was entering a bombing run.

Genette: What did you do?

Dancer: Oh, you know, we shook on it, compromised, and we had a beer, they backed off. Sorry, just being sarcastic. We had orders, so we tried to contact them. There was no reply. We fired the required three round warning shot. They started to slow down a bit. All it took was a missile lock on to make them change their mind.

Genette: Oh, wow. That must have been nerve wracking. Well, I'm afraid time's up.

Dancer: See you later.

INTERVIEW 5 JEFF G. KRASINSKIY AIRMAN FIRST CLASS (RET.) WIELVAKIAN AIR FORCE

Genette: Hello, Mr. Krasinskiy. I am William Genette, OBC. I am going to interview you about your experience in Erusea and audiotape our conversation. You are not being pressured, and if you don't feel like talking about something,  you don't have to.

Krasinskiy: Ok, I guess.

Genette: Ok. So you were a gunner?

Krasinskiy: That's right, gunner on a Black Hawk.

Genette: For how long?

Krasinskiy: New Year's Day 2011 til the end.

Genette: So you were in Le Liberte?

Krasinskiy: Yep. Worst moments of my life was there.

Genette: What was it like? Uh- if you don't mind my asking.

Krasinskiy: Um, I'd rather not say...

Genette: Ok. What were some of your duties?

Krasinskiy: I was a chopper gunner upon Viper 2? I forget. I had an M60. We would drop supplies out regularly, go on patrols, recon, stuff like that. I only remember one other time shooting other than Le Liberte. We were on recon of a lake near Le Liberte. We had to secure it to use its water supplies. The lake had entrenchments all around it. They called in the other three helicopters. I fired at an entrenchment filled with comms.

Genette: I see. Most of the other men I've interviewed said their worst battle was Le Liberte. Also, they had a lot more experience, some even going back to Belka.

Krasinskiy: They're what we would call lifers.

Genette: Oh, I would agree. Do you think that, had the crew been incapacitated, you could fly the helicopter?

Krasinskiy: Oh, no. But mainly because flying the helicopter has a higher standard in my mind. See, my pilots were the boss of the UH-60. It was their war horse. No way I could fly it like them.

Genette: Ah, ok. Thank you for your time, Mr. Krasinskiy.

Krasinskiy: Ah, no prob'.

GENETTE'S CONCLUSION: THOSE ARE THE TEN INTERVIEWS WITH THE VETERANS OF THE WIELVAKIA-ERUSEA CONFLICT. IT SEEMS THAT THOSE SIX MONTHS OF 2010-2011 WERE MONTHS OF CONFLICT. NOT ONLY WAS THERE OUR WAR IN YUKTOBANIA DURING THAT TIME, BUT THEIRS AS WELL, AND BOTH ARE EQUALLY IMPORTANT. ONE HAS NOT BEEN RECOGNIZED AS MUCH AND IT'S TIME FOR THEM TO FACE THE LIGHT. WHAT HAS JUST BEEN PUBLISHED IS A PRIMARY SOURCE OF THE WAR, STRAIGHT FROM THE GENERALS, SOLDIERS, OR PILOTS WHO ACTUALLY FOUGHT IN THEM.

INTERVIEW END.

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